How Faith Has Carried the Jewish People

History has been a subject that Rabbi Berel Wein (25 March 1934~) has concentrated on for many years. He has stated that we must know where we have been in order to know where we are going. Jewish History is integral to our understanding of the current rise in anti-Semitism and the ongoing anti-Israel/anti-Western hatred. Knowledge is power, and Rabbi Wein believes that it will empower us with the tools to dispel lies and myths about the Jewish people and Israel. It is knowledge that allows us to stand against baseless Jewish hatred and attacks, and to raise public awareness about the accusations of Islamophobia that are currently permeating the press with the intent to make the perpetrators of terror appear as victims.

Rabbi Wein is well known for his books, CDs/DVDs, audio tapes and drama documentary film projects produced through the Destiny Foundation. He is the Rabbi of Beit Knesset Hanasi in Jerusalem and regularly travels back and forth to America to teach and lecture.
Rabbi Wein continues to teach, write and produce documentaries as well as a weekly parsha for the press. He is involved in many causes and shows no signs of slowing down. When he is in Jerusalem he can usually be found at Beit Knesset Hanasi on Shabbat where he gives a Torah teaching after the morning service.
“The past is directly connected to our present, and both the past and the present,
whether we understand it or not, will impact upon our future…Rabbi Berel Wein”

The video below is one in a series that follows the path of the Jewish people in the last century. It is the story of a people striving to find their place in the world, and should be watched by all.

Follow the Jewish People at the Dawn of the Century~Knowledge is Power!

My Resting Place~15 October 2014

Sunset Over the Hills of Benjamin (Click to Enlarge)

Introduction to “Poems From the Pilgrims Path”

No Illustrations on these pages will you find;
But only pictures you imagine painted there.
The strokes were words
Brushed upon the canvas of your mind.

As wonderful the natural world and all creation be,
the hidden things that are not seen

but we perceive as real
Your eye may never see.

You have the power to create,
From conversation and conceptions ruminate.

From questions quest, to safely arrive
At some conclusion there at journeys end.

May it find you there, satisfied, my friend.

“Poems From the Pilgrims Path” by R.G. Fowler of Blessed Memory (Meridel’s Younger Brother)

Sukkot is Here! Time to Dwell Joyfully in A Sukkah!

In Israel it sometimes feels like the last quarter of the year is a series of holidays! We first celebrate Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year), followed by Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement), and now we are about to enter into the eight days of Sukkot (Feast of Booths)

After the Shofar is sounded, and we break our fast at the end of Yom Kippur, there is a flurry of activity as people begin building thier Sukkahs. These small, fragile, temporary domiciles are a remnant from the days the Jews were brought out of Egypt and traversed the Sinai desert before entering the Holy Land. 
Here are a few hinto to build your own Sukkah. (*Please Note* These are only general tips~anyone interested in Halakic rules should consult an appropriate rabbi or kosher internet site)
Your Sukkah must be outdoors, with easy access to your house. There should not be anything between the schach on the roof and the sky~no trees, roofs, umbrellas, etc. The walls can me made of anything from wood to plastic as long as they are tied down and will not blow away. Some people use a wall of the house, as when building on an open balcony. There is no specific size, but the idea is to be able to sit on a chair in the Sukkah and eat your meal. 
Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

For the roof you must use schach~raw, unfinished “vegetable matter”. In Israel, many people use palm fronds, but you could also use evergreen branches, corn stalks bamboo or special schach mats.

It is important that you do not use an overhead trellis or any live branches attached to a tree or plant. Many people use thin strips of wood to make a lattice then lay the branches over top.

When laying the branches, don’t make them too thick~you should be able to look up and see bits of the sky.

Once the dwelling is up you can decorate with lights, pictures, shiny balls or anything that you like. Add a table and chairs and you are ready to dwell! At night you can remove the table and chairs and lay down a sleeping bag or mattress, or if you have the space, curtain off the back of the Sukkah.

It is great fun to walk through the religious areas of Jerusalem and see the Sukkot hanging from balconies, on stilts and leaning against apartments. At night you hear the giggling of children as they “sleep under the sky” for the week.
It is said that one should make every attempt to be joyful for the full eight days. Think about it~if everyone in the world would focus only on joy and peace for those eight days~who knows what it could lead to!

…But on the fifteenth day of the seventh month (Tishrei),
when you gather in the produce of the land,
you shall celebrate the festival of the Lord for a seven day period;
the first day shall be a rest day, and the eighth day shall be a rest day.

And you shall take for yourselves on the first day,
the fruit of the hadar tree, date palm fronds, a branch of a braided tree, and willows of the brook, and you shall rejoice before the Lord your God for a seven day period.

And you shall celebrate it as a festival to the Lord for seven days in the year.
[It is] an eternal statute throughout your generations [that] you celebrate it in the seventh month.

For a seven day period you shall live in booths.
Every resident among the Israelites shall live in booths,

…in order that your [ensuing] generations should know that I had the children of Israel
live in booths when I took them out of the land of Egypt.
I am the Lord, your God…Leviticus 23:39~43  

 Chag Sameach to Everyone!  

Shana Tova~Rosh Hashanah 5775

Rosh Hashanah is the New Year on the Jewish Calendar. Tomorrow (Wednesday, 24 September 2014) at sundown, Israel begins the first night of Rosh Hashanah.

In the days leading up to Rosh Hashanah, Jews say Selichot (Prayers of Forgiveness). The Sephardic community began Selichot after midnight on the first day of the month of Elul (16 August 5774) For the Ashkenazic community Selichot started after midnight on Saturday, 21 September.
This is a time of prayers and repentence as well as a time of great celebration. On this day, Hashem makes his “assessment” of the whole world. It is said that on Rosh Hashanah, three books are opened. The righteous are immediately inscribed in the Book of Life~they are sealed “to live”. Those in the middle are given ten days (until Yom Kippur) to repent, while the wicked are “erased from the Book of Life” forever. Of  course, we all pray that we will be inscribed and sealed in the Book of Life for another year!
Like all celebrations we want to have family and friends, good food and happiness on this day. We at Jerusalem Vistas / Israel Vision are praying for new, and better things to happen in 5775.
We thank you all for your ongoing prayers and support~without you we could not continue. Our wish is that all of you will be “Incribed and Sealed in the Book of Life for a Sweet, Healthy, Happy and Prosperous Year”
לשנה טובה תכתב ותחתם “Leshana tovah tikatev v’tichatem
May You Be Inscribed and Sealed For a Good Year!
Book of Good Life~The Maccabeats
 Dip Your Apple~The Fountainheads
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